Jared Fanning

Jared Fanning

Top: YouTube glitch (yesterday)
Bottom: rotated Barnett Newman Dionysius (1949)

Top: YouTube glitch (yesterday)

Bottom: rotated Barnett Newman Dionysius (1949)

Such a great picture, crazy stride
buzzfeedsports:

Wilt Chamberlain running high school track

Such a great picture, crazy stride

buzzfeedsports:

Wilt Chamberlain running high school track

Posted this on dribbble - playing around with this guy and various summer vacation moods.

Posted this on dribbble - playing around with this guy and various summer vacation moods.

Simple vs Simplistic

oof - a great reminder

We’re at ‘peak photographer’ at the moment. There is an entire idiot class of professional photographer who seem to believe they’re creating something essential every time they pick up a camera. It’s not the photographer’s fault. I blame the creative directors who commission them. There are way too many photographs in the world. Think of how many pictures have been taken all over the world in the time you’ve read this article – even this sentence. This is another sentence I’ve just typed, so that’s like a ton more. All these images multiplying and multiplying. All those shitty pictures of cats and beautiful sunsets that sit dying in the corner of your smart phone, shared with the hope of being liked by people who all have the same thousand pictures hiding on their phone. All these forgettable memories. I don’t see that’s much different from the endless stream of boring fashion pictures, boring travel pictures, boring still lifes of food that are commissioned by magazines, ad agencies, marketing firms. For every Juergen Teller there are a million Terry Richardsons. So let’s just stop. Or just use what’s there already. Or at least think about it. Sorry I’ve lost my thread. What was the question again?

Work Process

A great pairing of posts I came across today on work process:

The Tragedy and Triumph of Mise-en-place by Mitch Goldstein &

No New Tools by Frank Chimero

Made a quick illustration inspired by Earle’s barns.

Made a quick illustration inspired by Earle’s barns.

Have you met: Eyvind Earle

I met Eyvind Earle through Disney several years ago. You’d immediately recognize his work from Peter Pan and most notably Sleeping Beauty, where he was responsible for the styling, backgrounds and color. But outside of Disney his work is just as amazing, especially his series of barns. His use of scale and perspective is really inspiring.

As a child his father required Eyvind to either read 50 pages of a book or paint a picture. He did both, and had his first one-man showing in France when he was only 14.

There’s a great mini doc (narrated by Earle) of his life and work on his site. Earle passed away in 2000.

Desire Paths

A friend posted a picture of a desire path today and it got me thinking about the idea of “desire paths” and design. Desire paths are a great example of not properly planning user behavior - check out this article on medium by @jussiahola. “The paths that you have designed into your products are often not the paths that people actually tread along when they use your product.”